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What time is the full ‘Buck Moon’ eclipse tonight in Toronto?

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TORONTO, ON., July 4, 2020 — Not only will stargazers be excited about watching the full ‘Buck’ moon rise over the lake tonight but there also will be a partial lunar eclipse to watch out for.

Stargazers across most of North and South America as well as parts Africa and southwestern Europe will be able to witness a partial eclipse if the skies cooperate. This means, what The Old Farmer’s Almanac refers to as the ‘Buck Moon’ will only pass through the the lightest part of the shadow of the Earth, which is called the penumbra. The penumbral lunar eclipse will result in the moon’s surface darkening very slightly. At most, depending on your location, 35 percent of the visible moon will pass into the light shadow of the Earth.

But even if the partial eclipse isn’t that visible, watching a full moon rise over Lake Ontario is always an exciting moment.

Space.com captures the partial lunar eclipse. Image by Gianluca Masi

Today’s full moon rise is expected to occur in the Toronto area beginning at around 9:48 pm and the eclipse will start tonight at around 11:08 p.m. EDT (0308 GMT Sunday, July 5) and end on Sunday at 1:53 a.m. EDT (0553 GMT), according to In-the-Sky.org.

https://twitter.com/StarWalk/status/1278856744291176449
Star Walk Eclipse Guide

This first full moon of summer actually has many names. According to the Farmer’s Almanac the ‘buck’ reference is because early summer is when a buck’s antlers are in full growth mode. It is derived from the Algonquin tribes along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River and around the Great Lakes. This full moon is also referred to as a ‘Thunder Moon’ due to the frequent storms that occur in July. The summer’s first full moon is also referred to as a ‘Guru Moon’ and ‘Hay Moon.’

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has long honoured the tradition of naming moons by the full Moon names that were used during Native American and colonial times to help track the seasons.

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